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Kindergarten Learning Calendars

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These Learning Activity Calendars are for all students unable to engage in remote learning.  All activities are child-centered, developmentally appropriate learning experiences. Organized through the Four Frames of the Kindergarten Program, these learning opportunities provide parents with activities relevant to the integrated way in which learning occurs for our youngest learners. It is our hope that these learning experiences for home will support the continued development of the students in Kindergarten classes.

If you’d like to download the whole package for Week 1 (Jan. 4th – 8th) as a PDF, click here —> Kindergarten Learning Calendar (Jan. 4th – 8th)

If you’d like to download the whole package 2-week package for Jan. 11th – 15th as a PDF, click here —> Kindergarten Learning Calendar (2 Week Plan).

If you’d like to download the whole 2-week package for Jan. 25th – Feb. 5th as a PDF, click here —> Kindergarten Calendar for Weeks 4 and 5

Monday

Optional Read Aloud: Best Friend Trouble by Frances Itani

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing

Best Friends!

Show the picture to your child. Give them time to study the picture carefully. Ask: “What is going on in this picture?” When they tell you their ideas, ask, “What makes you say that?”.  Extend their thinking by asking, “What else do you see?”, “Do they look like friends?”, “What makes a good friend?”, “How are you a good friend?”.

Extension: Draw a picture showing being a good friend/showing kindness.

Can you label your drawing?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Say or write down the names of 10 classmates from your class.  Say your classmate’s names out loud. As you say the name try to jump the syllables (e.g., Sam = 1 jump, Gurpreet = 2 jumps). Can you do the same with the names of the members in your family? Extension: Look around your home. Draw pictures of objects that have 2 syllables. On another page, draw pictures of objects that have 3 syllables.

Set up a tea party for your stuffed animals, toys and/or family members.  While the child is playing you might say: “You have 3 table settings, if you add one more how many will you have altogether?” After the child responds ask, “How do you know?”

Extension: Have child participate in a real cooking experience with real food. Use simple directions and have the child add ingredients and stir the ingredients.  Use the real food at the tea party!

Problem Solving and Innovating Can you build a home for one of your stuffed animals or toys? What materials will you need to build your home? (e.g., food containers, paper tubes, blocks and boxes).  Make a list of items. Then, create a plan either by telling a grownup your plan or drawing how you will build your home with the materials you collected.  Build your home!

Extension: After building the home you might ask: Tell me about your home. What would you do different next time? How could you make your home bigger/smaller/taller/wider?

Self-Regulation and Well-Being Look in the mirror.  Discuss what you see and the things that make you unique and special.  Create movements based on different feelings.  Ask your child how to move their body if they were sad, happy, upset, angry, excited, scared, nervous, sick, tired.

Play “Head-Shoulders-Knees-Toes” to help your child learn and practice following instructions, thinking before they do an action, and staying calm/relaxed when things go wrong.  Say “touch your head, shoulders, knees and toes”.  Say the body part out loud when your child touches it.  Do this again but in a different order (e.g., knees, head, shoulders, toes).  Do this again but in a different order (e.g., toes, head, knees, shoulders).  Next, say “listen to my words, touch your head” but touch your knees. Your child needs to touch the body part you said out loud “head” not knees!  Try this again with a 3-5 more body parts.

Extension: have the child lead the game.

Tuesday

Optional Read Aloud: Sticks and Stones by Phoebe McGuffee

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Go outside or look out your window and draw a picture of a tree or an animal that you can see. Write a sentence describing the surroundings.

Extension: Talk or write about how we can look after living things in the world around us.

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Take a walk or look out your window. Do a survey on paper of how many different types of trees, birds and animals you see.  Extension: Draw a picture and label.

Use stones, twigs or items around the home (e.g., coins, dry beans). Play a game of tic tac toe.  Stop between or after the game and ask, “How many stones are there?”, “How many do we have in total?”, “How do you know?”

Problem Solving and Innovating Gather some natural materials like sticks, rocks and pinecones from your yard, outside or from a trail.  Invite your child to use the materials to create a picture. Take a photo of their outdoor art.

Create a homemade bird feeder with a grown-up.  What materials could you use? (e.g., toilet paper roll, stale bagel, pinecone or milk carton and peanut butter, cooking lard or fat).  Have your child explore the building process as they work on problem-solving skills and learn about birds and what they eat. Once the bird feeder is created and placed outside, engage your child by having them check on the feeder and observe what birds come to visit!

Extension: Create a list of the birds that came to visit, tally how many birds came to visit, draw a picture of your favourite bird, draw the bird feeder you created and label.

Self-Regulation and Well-Being Loose parts play is a great way for children to use their imagination, work on fine motor skills, and explore different materials.  Examples of loose parts might be plastic cups and lids, egg cartons, boxes, straws, pinecones and acorns, bubble wrap, paper tubes. Begin by gathering different items around your home (inside or outside) and then watch your child explore the items. This is a great way to engage in play with your child and see what ideas and themes they explore with the different items. Allow your child to lead the play and encourage them by asking questions or making observations (e.g., talk about shapes, colours, textures you notice, “tell me about how you designed that”, “what do you think you could do with these pinecones and acorns?”)

Wednesday

Optional Read Aloud: Baby Animals Playing by Suzi Eszterhas

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Look around your home (inside or outside) and think about what you could take care of. Do you have a plant that you could water? A bird feeder to fill? A fish to feed? A dog to walk? A sibling to help get their shoes/boots on? Decide how you could take care of something and share your plan with an adult.
Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Look at this pattern:

 

 

 

 

Discuss what you know about patterns. Then, go outside with a grown-up and find items that you can use to make your own pattern, like twigs, acorns, or rocks.  Tell your grownup about your pattern. What kind of pattern did you make? How do you know it is a pattern? Take a photograph of the pattern you created.  Extension: Make another pattern using different items, make your pattern longer, look for patterns in your environment (e.g., outside, books, photographs), draw and label your pattern.

What letters and sounds can you hear in the words, “CAT”, “DOG” “BIRD”? Do you have any of these letters in your name? Practice writing these words using a crayon, a marker and a pencil.

Extension: Find items in your home that start with the letter C, D and B. Write a list of the items you found.

Problem Solving and Innovating Read the Lyrics to the Going Green Song or Listen to the Song on YouTube

https://youtu.be/l08W6aTW4PE

I turn the faucet off when I am brushing my teeth 
I turn the lights off when I am going to sleep 
I use cold water to wash laundry 
I do all that I can to save energy 
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle 
I’m going green, I’m keeping the Earth clean 
I’m going green, I’m keepin‘ it, keepin‘ it clean 
I reuse rechargeable batteries again and again 
I shop at the thrift store to find a great bargain 
I take my bottles and cans and recycle them 
We’ll make a better world if we all join hands 
Reduce energy, water and waste 
Reuse what I can before I throw it away 
Recycle CD’s and DVD’s 
Newspaper, Junk Mail and Magazines 
Cell Phones, Cardboard and Old Machines 
I’m going green, would you go with me? Reduce, Reuse, Recycle 
I’m going green, I’m keeping the Earth clean 
I’m going green, I’m keepin‘ it, keepin‘ it clean! 

Source: Musixmatch
Songwriters: Mark Luchauer

Circle any of the rhyming words that you see or hear. Look for any popcorn words (words that appear regularly in reading).  Some examples are – I, a, and, in, the, etc. 

Talk about some of the things that you can do as a family to help the environment.  

Self-Regulation and Well-Being Get outside! Spend some time in your yard, at the park, in your driveway or going for a walk with a family member. 

Play red light, green lightWith a grown up, find a safe open space (e.g., a park, a sidewalk, a driveway). Stand on one side of the space. Listen to the instructions.  The grown up will call out either green light or red light.  For green light you will move your body towards the grown up. For red light, you will stand still. Continue until you catch up to the grown up.  Take turns being the caller. Extension: change your movement – hop, skip, crawl on a green light.  

Thursday

Optional Read Aloud: Helping Out is Cool  by Ellen Feinman Moss

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Let’s play ‘Would you rather?’ Would you rather clean your room or wash the dishes? Once you’ve decided, plan to do one of these activities by the end of the day. Tell a family member what you did to help.

Extension: Your friend wants to wash the dishes too. Write or draw out the steps to wash dishes (e.g., first fill the sink with water, then…).

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Help a grown up with laundry! Can you sort the laundry items into different piles? You could ask “I wonder how we might sort the laundry?”.  Follow the child’s lead and then ask, “how did you sort them?” (e.g., by size, colour, style).  Extension: what patterns do you notice? Can you find a big sock and a little sock?  How many white/black socks can you find? Create a graph with the different laundry items and include how many of each item you have.

Helping others is a good thing to do.  Have you been helpful at home or at school? Discuss an example of a time you were helpful. Think about someone you know that has helped you. Why are they helpful? What did they do that was helpful?

Extension: Make this person a thank you card.

Problem Solving and Innovating Your friend has lost their favourite toy. How will you help them to find it? How will you help them to feel better?

Extension: An adult in your family asks for your help to bake a cake. What do you know about baking? How could you help them?  Draw a picture to show your thinking.

Self-Regulation and Well-Being The zipper on your coat is broken and one of your boots is missing. How do you feel? Draw a picture to show your feelings and then talk about how you could solve the problem.

Let’s play freeze dance! In an open space (inside or outside), play music or sing a song. When the music stops you need to freeze (stop your body). Continue until the music ends or your body is tired!

Extension: come up with different ways to pose when the music stops (e.g., yoga pose, imitate an animal, lift one foot off the ground).

Friday

Optional Read Aloud: Monster Knows Numbers by Lori Capote

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Go outside and find five items that are smaller than your hand and five items that are larger than your hand. Ask, “Do these items belong inside or outside?” and “What should we do with them?”

Create a self-portrait with natural materials. During your time outside, collect various nature items (e.g. pebbles, sticks, fallen leaves). Use these items to create what you think your face might look like. Count how many items you used to make your eyes, nose, ears, mouth and hair.

Extension: Create a family portrait.

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Find six objects in the kitchen that are different sizes. Arrange the objects in order from smallest to largest. Ask questions like, “How do you know this one is bigger/smaller?” or “Can you describe the largest and smallest object?”

Let’s Measure! Find an item you can use to measure different objects around your home (e.g., a spoon, ruler, straw, stick).  Can you find things that are smaller and bigger than your measuring tool?  Make a list or draw pictures of the objects you measured. Circle the smaller objects.

Extension: Count how many smaller things you found. Record the number. Then, count how many bigger things you found and record the number. Which number is bigger?

Problem Solving and Innovating Build a structure as tall as you are using toys and/or household objects. Discussion: “How did you get everything to stack together?”, “Did some pieces fit better than others? Why?”

Extension: Draw your structure, measure your structure, and tell a family member how you built your structure.

Creating and participating in obstacle courses is a great way to explore materials, express creativity, engage in physical education, and create fun challenges. Can you build an obstacle course? What items could you use? (e.g., furniture, blankets, pillows, laundry basket).  Take a grown up through your obstacle course. Do you need to make any changes? Why?

Extension: Write out the obstacle course instructions or draw your plan.

Self-Regulation and Well-Being Make up a dance to your favourite song. Create two big dance moves (using arms and legs, for example) and two small dance moves (using hands and feet). Ask a family member to join you and dance to your favourite song using the moves you created.

Count your breathing! This is a great strategy to help calm our bodies down and support the development of self-regulation. Breathe in for a count of 4, then pause to hold onto the breath for a count of 4, breathe out for a count of 4, and pause when the breath empties for a count of 4. For an even easier version, simply count your breath until you get to 10 (counting 1 on the inhale, 2 on the exhale, and so on).  Then, start over at 1.

Extension: Can you teach a family member how to count their breathing?

Monday

Optional Read Aloud:  I Am Enough  By: Grace Bryers

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home.

What is one of your favourite things to do with your family? Explain why?
What is something you would like to try or explore with your family? Explain why?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Let’s Talk About It!
Using the picture provided, share a story about what is happening in this picture with someone in your home. Use the following questions to add supporting details to your story: What/Who do you see? What happened before this picture was taken? What do you think will happen next? Writing extension: On a piece of paper, label and/or write a sentence to represent your story.Scavenger Hunt
For this hunt you will need to find four pieces of paper. On each paper draw one shape (e.g., circle, square, triangle, rectangle). Can you write the name of the shape on the paper? Search your home(inside or outside) for objects that match each shape.Extension: Count how many objects you found for each shape (e.g., circle = 5). Write the number on the paper. Do this for all 4 shapes.
Problem Solving and Innovating Guess that Food
Collect, print, or draw pictures of foods and put them in a container. Pick foods that provide an appropriate level of challenge for the child. Ask the child to close their eyes and pull a picture out of the container. The other players look at the picture the child pulled from the container and then one person tapes the picture to the child’s back without them seeing it (or places it face down on a surface). The child opens their eyes, and the other players begin to provide clues to the child, one at a time, about the food taped to their back. For example, if the picture is of a carrot, clues could include: The food is orange. The food is crunchy. The food is long. The food grows in the ground. The food is a vegetable.  The child continues to ask for clues until they guess the food. Players take turns being the person to guess the food until all the foods have been guessed.Extension: Attach 3-5 food photos to a piece of paper using tape or glue. Label the food.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Puppets
Find a safe and open play area with a grownup. Stand a safe distance apart from each other.  The grownup will act as the “puppeteer” and you will act as the “puppet”.  The puppeteer will demonstrate and/or calls out a series of actions for the puppet to follow, such as:
“I’m loosening strings!” (Puppets go loose and floppy)
“I’m tightening strings!” (Puppets stretch right up with toes, arms, legs, and whole body)
“I’m collapsing to the floor!” (Puppets “melt” to the floor in a heap)
Create some other actions for the puppet to follow.Extension: The child could be the puppeteer and lead the game.

Tuesday

Optional Read Aloud:  I Wish You More By: Amy Krouse Rosenthal

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

If you could have three wishes, what would they be? Explain why you made that choice.

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down for Beginning Sounds
This is a partner game that can be played with someone in your home. The grownup will read the list of words and the student will have to determine if the initial sound is the same. If it is, then it’s a thumbs up. If the initial sounds are not the same, then thumbs down.Word Pairings:

Map/Nap (down)
Climb/Clap (up)
Light/Sound (down)
Bed/Bike (up)
Play/Plane (up)
Book/Read (down)
Apple/Alligator (up)
Brown/Down (down)
Turtle/Talk (up)
Stick/Stamp (up)

Math and Playdough

You will need a pair of dice* and playdough. Practice numbers by rolling two dice and recording the numbers on a sheet of paper (e.g., six dots = 6). Show your thinking by creating corresponding playdough balls. How many playdough balls do you have? Is it the same as the number on the dice? How many playdough balls do you have in total? Can you count to that number?

Extension: Roll the dice again and record the numbers on a sheet of paper. Repeat 5 times.

*If you don’t have dice at home, write numbers 1-6 on small pieces of paper, shuffle and flip a card to reveal the number.

*if you don’t have playdough you could make small balls with paper.

Problem Solving and Innovating Play with Water!
With a grownup, fill up a bucket or sink with water.  Find items (e.g., a funnel, measuring cups/spoons, sponges, small plastic toys, wash cloth, dish soap to make bubbles) that you could add to your water.  Don’t forget a towel for cleanup! Roll up your sleeves and explore how the water feels.  During play you might ask “how does the water sound when you pour it?”, “do your measuring cups hold the same amount of water?”, “what did you find out when you put ___ in the water?”.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Look Up!
Do you wonder how clouds are made? This short optional Cloud Video shares information all about clouds (different types and names). Take some time to watch the sky.  Look out a window inyour home or look up during your outside time with a grownup.  Can you spot different patterns?Or see different shapes?Extension: Draw a picture of the clouds you saw. Label your drawing or write a sentence about your drawing.

Wednesday

Optional Read Aloud: Monster Knows Patterns By: Lori Capote

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

Name five things that make you happy. Why did you choose these 5 things?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Go Fish!
Preparation: From the following Kindergarten word list, write 10 high frequency words on cards: no, is, can, me, you, and, he, at, a, so, on, in, up, am, we, like, see, I, go, it, do, an, the, my, to. You will need two sets of words which creates a set of 20 cards.  Play by dealing 4 cards to each player. The remaining cards are placed face down in the middle of the table. Player 1 asks another player if they have a word. If they have it, they give it to the player, if not they say, “Go Fish!” and the player selects a new card. If a match is made the player continues with their turn. The game finishes when one player has found a match for all their cards.Make Snowballs
Make “snowballs” from paper (or any way you like).  Set up a basket (e.g., laundry basket, box, large bowl) on the other side of the room. Begin to throw your snowballs into the basket. Count how many are in the basket and how many are not in the basket. Explain if you had more or less in the basket. Challenge yourself by moving the basket farther awayExtension: Write a number on a piece of paper and stick it to your basket. Try and throw that many snowballs into the basket. Look and see how many snowballs made it into the basket. How many more snowballs would you need to get to the number you posted on the basket? (e.g., you chose 10 but only got 6 snowballs in the basket. You would need to throw 4 more snowballs to get to the number 10).
Problem Solving and Innovating Can you solve the mystery?
View the Mystery Car in the Forest – Video. The narrator explains that he went for a walk in the forest and found an old rusty car.  Do you have a hypothesis? Think about the following questions:“How did the car get in the forest?”, “How old is the car?”, “How long has the car been in the forest?”.  How do you know this? Share your thinking.Extension: Create a story that would explain how the car ended up in the forest.  Tell your story tosomeone in your home or draw a picture of the car in the forest and label.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Take 5
Spread your hand and stretch your fingers out like a star. You can choose your left hand or your right hand. Pretend the pointer finger of your other hand is a pencil and imagine you are going to trace around the outline of your hand and fingers.  Start at the bottom of your thumb and slide your finger up your thumb, pause at the top, and then slide your finger down the other side. Now, slide your pointer up your second finger, pause, and slide down the other side. Continue tracing your fingers up, pause, and down. Slide your finger slowly, watch your finger move and notice how it feels. Keep going until you have finished tracing your fifth finger (pinky).  Now add some breathing. Breathe in through your nose and breathe out through your mouth. Remember to keep it slow and steady.  Place your pointer finger at the bottom of your thumb and breathe in as you slide up. Breathe out as you slide down. Breathe in as you slide up your second finger and breathe out as you slide down. Keep going until you have finished tracing your fingers and you have taken five slow breaths. If the child dislikes the sensation of sliding their finger up and down their hand, try these ideas:

  • trace an outline of their hand on paper and they can trace their finger along the outline
  • stretch their fingers out like candles on a cake and slowly blow each candle out and tuck the finger into the palm

Thursday

Optional Read Aloud: Giraffe Problems By: Jory John

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

What is your favourite thing to do on a rainy day? What about on a sunny day?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Syllable the Room!
Preparation: Label three pieces of paper: 1, 2, 3 (as headings for three piles)
Find objects within your home (e.g., pencil, toothbrush, spoon, marker, book, food item, etc.). Pick up an object and say its name out loud. Next, clap the name with the syllables (e.g., pen-cil). Lastly, sort the object into the correct syllable pile where it belongs (e.g., pen-cil = 2 syllables). Sort the syllables of 10 objects around your home!Does it Sink or Float?
With a grown up, fill up a bucket or large bowl with water.  Find 10 objects that can be put into the water. Before you put the object in the water make a hypothesis (your best guess) if the object will sink or float. Drop the objects one at a time into the water to see what happens. Were you correct with your hypothesis? How do you know this?Extension: On a piece of paper create a chart to document your findings. At the top of the page print the words “sink “and “float”. List the objects under the correct word.
Problem Solving and Innovating Sock Ball Games
Prepare your area for play. Choose an area where there is enough space to roll, catch, toss and maybe kick. Remove breakable items. Chairs, couches, laundry baskets and boxes can be used as goals or targets in games. Only play games you can safely play in your space.
Make a sock ball. Roll and fold a pair of socks inside each other. For larger balls, use 3-4 pairs of socks. Adult socks work well. Get ready to play!Soccer

  • practice shooting on a goal (laundry basket laid on its side, a box, under a chair, etc.)

Bowling

  • set up clean and empty milk containers, cans, plastic bottles, paper towel rolls, Lego, etc. as the pins
  • A grownup can show the player how to set up the pins or have the player try several configurations themselves
  • players can play alone or play against another (competing or cooperating)

Basketball

  • practice shooting on a basket (laundry basket, cardboard box, laundry hamper, Rubbermaid or any other container turned upright
  • shoot from different distances
  • with more than one player, take turns and no blocking allowed

Throw and Catch

  • stand apart and throw or toss to each other
  • as you improve, add some trick throws (under your leg, from behind your back, etc.)
Self-Regulation and Well-Being About Me Tee
Draw an outline of a t-shirt on a blank piece of paper or print an online template. Together, brainstorm positive words that can be used to describe people (e.g., smart, funny, kind, happy, hardworking, gentle). Ask the child what characteristic(s) they feel are most like them.  Then, provide the child with the t-shirt template and have them write the characteristic(s) they chose and on the t-shirt template and design it. Help them with writing as needed. If available, provide a variety of art supplies to decorate the t-shirt template.Extension:  Do any family members or friends have the same characteristics as you? If yes, who?  When you are feeling sad or angry with yourself how could you use the t-shirt you designed to help you with your feelings?

Friday

Optional Read Aloud: The Rabbit Listened By: Cori Doerrfeld

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

What is one thing you have never done but want to try? Where can you learn more about this?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Let’s Play Bang!
Customize your own word game. Write down 10 words that the child knows and 5 words that they do not know (they can be family names, sight words, etc.)

  • Here’s what you’ll need: an empty container, some blank pieces of paper cut into cards, and some markers.
  • Write down the 15 words on little cards
  • You’ll also want to make up a few cards with the word “BANG!” on them.

How to Play Bang!

  1. Players take turns reaching into the container and pulling out a card.  If they can read the word aloud correctly, they get to keep the card.  If the player is incorrect, the card goes back into the container.
  2. Continue taking turns, reading and collecting correctly answered cards.
  3. If you pull out a BANG! card, you must put your whole pile of cards back into the container!
  4. At the end of a specified length of time, whoever has the most cards is the winner!

Optional: Measuring Rain and Snow
Have you ever wondered how much it rains or snows where you live? Try this measuring idea.  You will need a plastic bottle, marker, stones, a ruler or tape measure.

First, have a grownup cut off the top half of the plastic bottle (like the photo)or use a plastic container. Then, take the bottle outside and find a good spot for it. Add stones to the bottle so it doesn’t blow over. Leave it outside and check regularly. When it does rain, or snow draw a line on the bottle to indicate how much rain or snow fell that day (you could write the day of the week too).  Which day has more, and which day has less?

Extension: Using your measuring tool measure how much liquid is in the bottle each day. How much total liquid is there? Can you find something in your home that is the same measurement? Can you find something that is bigger/smaller?

Problem Solving and Innovating Treasure Hunt
Using a basket, box, or a bag collect a variety of items in your home that are of interest to you. With a grownup check in cupboards, drawers, and closets.Some examples could include:

  • Sheets, towels, face cloths, blankets, napkins. These items could be used for building forts or dressing up.
  • Bowls, baking tins, eating utensils, mixing and serving utensils, funnels, sieve, canning jar rings, elastics, and aluminum foil. These items could be used for kitchen or cooking play. Add water for mixing and pouring. Add rags for cleaning play.

Provide lots of uninterrupted time for the child to engage with the items. You might ask “do you have any ideas about how we might begin?”, “tell me about your…”, “I wonder what would happen if you tried …”, “how could you make that? (taller, wider, longer)”, “how does that water sound when you pour it?”, “what did you find out when you put ____ in the water?”.

Self-Regulation and Well-Being Listening Walk
Take a walk in your neighbourhood. Find a spot to stop for a few minutes and listen together for sounds in nature. Talk about what you hear, smell, see and feel outdoors. Encourage deep breathing by breathing in to the count of 5, exhale to the count of 5. Repeat.

Monday

Optional Read Aloud: Little Pea By: Amy Krouse Rosenthal

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

What is your favourite season and what do you love about it? Poll your family members to find out what their favourite season is. Did anyone choose the same season as you?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Let’s Talk About It!
Using the picture provided, share a story about what is happening in this picture with someone in your home. Use the following questions to add supporting details to your story: What/Who do you see? What happened before this picture was taken?  What do you think will happen next?Writing extension: On a piece of paper, label and/or write a sentence to represent your story.
Best Guess Using a piece of paper try and estimate the following topics below. Make a chart and record your answer and the actual answer.  How many socks are in your drawer? What is the length of your bed? How many mL of water can a small bowl in your cupboard hold? How many utensils are in the drawer? How many items are under your bed? How many writing utensils are in your kitchen?
Extension/Reflection: What might help you estimate? How close did you come? What did help you know the answer? What will you remember from this experience?
Problem Solving and Innovating Sock Ball Bocce
Prepare your area for play. Choose an area where there is enough space to roll or underhand toss. Remove breakable items. Set the game up based on the space you have. You can always move closer or further away to make it easier or harder. Place an empty and clean object inside the middle of a circle.  Object is a bottle or something to knock over like Lego tower, clean and empty milk containers, cans, plastic bottles, paper towel rolls, etc. Use a string, cord, towel or something to make a circle.  Place a marker to show where to toss from (a cup, a toy, a hat, a coin, etc.).  Decide on a score that will win the game.
Make sock balls. Roll a sock inside itself to make a ball. You can also use small stuffed toys.
Play! Taking turns, each player tosses from behind the marker. Points are awarded each round.
Points:
1 point if neither player gets it the circle but has a sock ball that is the closest to the bottle
2 points for getting it in the ring
3 points for knocking the bottle downPlay until someone reaches a score you decide upon before starting. Or play with no score and have a winner every round. Or just play for fun!
Extension:  Play with 4 balls and 4 turns each round. Alternate turns. Reset pin between turns if necessary.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Dinner, Dinner, Dinner
Collect old magazines, flyers, printed or drawn pictures of healthy foods. Draw three plates on a piece of paper. Explain that they will use the pictures to create three different dinner meals for the family using foods from each food category (whole grain foods, protein foods, and fruits/vegetables).  The child will cut out their chosen healthy food items and glue, tape or place them onto the plates. When complete, review the meals they made and ask the child to describe their meals and discuss why it is important to eat foods from each food category.
Extension:  You can make one of the meals for dinner if the ingredients are available.  From the three you made, which meal is your favourite? Why?  Make meals for breakfast lunch and dinner.

Tuesday

Optional Read Aloud: Duck! Rabbit! By: Amy Krouse Rosenthal

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

What superpower would you like to have and why? Where could you use this superpower? When could you use this superpower?  How will others know you have this superpower?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Rhyming Sing Song

Down by the Bay (Song by Raffi)
Down by the Bay
Where the watermelons grow
Back to my home I dare not go
For if I do my mother will say
Have you ever seen a goose kissing a moose?
Down by the bay

Continue to sing the song and develop new rhyming words or use these suggestions:
Whale – with a polka dot tail, Fly – wearing a tie, Bat – flying on a mat, Dog – sailing on a log, Bear – blow drying his hair, Llamas – wearing striped pajamas, Goat – driving a boat.

Home for a Bear (or favourite toy, animal, character)
Gather empty grocery boxes (cereal, crackers etc.), shoe boxes, or small baskets. Can you make ahome for your bear? If available, use masking tape or glue to help with building. Have a discussion about how many boxes you are using, the number of sides and corners on the boxes. Think aboutother items that could be used to add to your bear’s home. Discuss where the bear is in relation to the home (e.g., in front of, behind, inside, on top of, beside).

Problem Solving and Innovating Ramp It Up!
Ramps help children gain experience with force and motion. With the help of a grownup, locate planks of wood, or long pieces of cardboard (e.g., cereal boxes, broken down cardboard boxes).This will be your ramp.  Then, build a platform (e.g., pillows, smaller boxes, chair or couch) to hold up your ramp. Use balls, toy cars, or things that roll or move from around your home to understand how your ramp works. Try moving your ramp higher or lower. What happened?
Extension: Explore differences in speed and distance. Make a guess about which objects will move faster, slower, or farther.  Write down your findings. Were your guesses correct? How do you know this? What could you do differently to get a different result?
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Let’s Pretend!
Either indoors or outdoors, pretend to be different animals with the child. Try to imitate the movements of different animals to practice coordination and balance.  Hop on all fours like a frog and say “ribbit-ribbit-ribbit” or bend your knees, walk with your legs far apart, and swing your arms like a chimpanzee, stretch like a giraffe or jump like a kangaroo.Let’s practice how to calm our body. Take a deep breath in and like you’re smelling a beautiful flower.  Breathe out like you’re blowing out candles on a cake.  Does your belly fill up with air? Do you feel your body calming? Repeat breathing until you feel calm.

Wednesday

Optional Read Aloud: Love Is By: Diane Adams

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

If you were responsible for the meals for your family, what would you serve for breakfast, lunch and dinner?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Concentration
Preparation: From the following Kindergarten word list, write 10 high frequency words on cards: no, is, can, me, you, and he, at, a, so, on, in, up, am, we, like, see, I, go, it, do, an, the, my, to. You will need two sets of words which creates a set of 20 cards.
Play! Place cards face down on a table (start with a small number of words and increase slowly). Each player turns over two words and reads them. If a match is made the player keeps the cards and gets another turn. Play until all the cards have been collected.What’s Missing?
With a grownup, collect 5-15 small items inside (e.g., toy, spoon, spatula, shoe, sock, mitten)and/or outside (e.g., stick, acorn, stone).  Find a space where you can sit and spread the items out in front of you. Note: the more items used the more difficult the game. Take a few minutes to memorize the items and then cover your eyes. The grownup will remove one of the items andthen you can uncover your eyes.  What item was removed? Take a guess! Put the missing item back and play again.
Extension: Remove two or three items at a time and guess what is missing.
Problem Solving and Innovating Transient Art
Collect small items (e.g., buttons, pebbles, pieces of yarn or string), cardboard or paper, scissors (if needed), a measuring tool (e.g., ruler), pencil and an empty photo frame with no glass (or use sticks to make a frame shape).  With these items create a design, a picture, or a pattern using the frame as your space to work. Items in the picture can be reused to make new designs, pictures or patterns.
Extension: Draw what you created. Label with a title or a sentence telling others about your art.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Bedtime
Have a conversation with the child on the importance of quality sleep (For example, helps your brain develop, gives your muscles a needed rest, helps your body grow, helps you concentrate, etc.). Explain that part of quality sleep can involve having a bedtime routine to help your body wind down and know it is time to sleep. Together, brainstorm all the things you think can contribute to a positive bedtime routine (e.g., setting a time each night to unwind and get ready for bed, limiting blue lights from screens one hour before bed, going to bed at the same time every night, spending time doing a quiet activity like reading, having a nutritious snack, etc.  Invite the child to create a bedtime routine for quality sleep. Explain that a routine is a sequence of actions or steps. Ask the child to write their routine on a piece of paper and support with writing as needed. If the child already has a bedtime routine, encourage them to write it down. Review the bedtime routine together and discuss if there are any other things to add or consider. Post the routine where the child can see it and follow it at bedtime.
Extension/Reflection:  Do you think your bedtime routine is the same or different than other kids your age? Why?  How do you think your bedtime routine will change as you get older?

Thursday

Optional Read Aloud: The Day the Crayons Quit By: Drew Daywalt

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

If you could have one animal as a pet, what would it be?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Thumbs up/Thumbs Down
Review the concept of rhyme as “words that sound alike”. Give an example, such as “bike andhike” rhyme, but “bike and banana” do not rhyme.  Say two words; some rhyme and some will not. The students must decide — “thumbs up” for rhyming or “thumbs down” for not rhyming.  Choose from the following word list:

Cats/Dogs
Snail/Pail
Bear/Tear
Shark/Bat
Grape/Ape
Rug/Room
Sail/Pail
Robot/Picnic
Log/Dog
Socks/Rocks

Air Power

Gather a variety of items that you think you can blow with your mouth or through a straw. Some suggestions could be a feather, a marble, tinfoil rolled up into a ball, ping pong ball, pom pom, and/or a piece of sponge. Set up the materials on a table or in a safe space on the floor. Before starting ask the child to predict which item they feel they could move the farthest with one blow from their mouth or through the straw. Try with each of the items you gathered. Compare which went farthest and which stayed closest to your items.

Extension: Set up a finish line a distance away. Guess how many blows it will take to move a certain item across the finish line. Try with all the items and record your findings. Compare the results.

Problem Solving and Innovating What’s Inside?
Go on a “search and find” with someone in your home.  Look for household items and put themin a bag, box or sock.  Some items might include: a hairbrush, comb, kitchen utensil, soap, toys, fruits, vegetables.  What’s inside? Begin to take turns with someone in your home first by feeling the item (without looking) and then guessing what it is.  Was your guess correct? If so, how did you know what the item was?
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Hop and Jump!
Find a spot in your home to start (e.g., front door of your home, bedroom door). Stand still and decide where you want to go next (e.g., bathroom, bedroom, kitchen). Begin jumping on two feet to get to your destination. When you get there tell someone in your home how many jumps it took to get there.  Try a new destination! How many jumps did that take?
Extension:  Hop on one foot from one destination to another. How many hops did it take to get there? Try and count by 2’s as you hop or jump to your next destination.

Friday

Optional Read Aloud: Anything is Possible By: Guilia Belloni

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Question of the Day: Discuss the daily question with someone in your home

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour  If You Think You Know This Word

Sing this song to the tune of “If You’re Happy and You Know It”
If you think you know this word, shout it out!
If you think you know this word, shout it out!
If you think you know this word, then tell me what you’ve heard
If you think you know this word, shout it out!

Tell the child a segmented word sound by sound such as c-a-t. The child will blend the sounds together to discover the mystery word. Continue to practice three sound words from the suggested list:

s-u-n           w-e-b                s-o-ck
r-a-t            m-oo-n             h-o-t
b-u-s           d-o-ll                 d-o-g

Write and Use a Recipe
Invite the child to help make a simple snack (e.g., fruit salad, dry cereal mix, toast).  Work together to write out a recipe for this snack using words and pictures.  Then follow the recipe to make the snack. You might discuss the numbers in the recipe (e.g., 1 cup of cereal or 5 grapes), different measurements (e.g., tablespoon, teaspoon, cup) and quantity (e.g., 1 cup + 1 cup = 2 cups). Enjoy your snack.

Problem Solving and Innovating What is it?
Provide the child with a piece of paper with a circle, zig zag or some combination of lines or shapes and ask them to use their creative brain to finish the picture in an interesting way. If possible, provide a variety of coloured pencils or markers or art materials.
You might ask “what can you tell me about your design?”, “where did you get the idea?”, “what title would you give this picture?”.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being As If
Stand in an open space.  Try and do each activity for 10-15 seconds.
A grownup will read the action:
jog in place as if a big scary bear is chasing you
walk forward as if you’re walking through chocolate pudding
jump in place as if you are popcorn popping
reach up as if grabbing balloons out of the air
march in place and play the drums as if you are in a marching band
paint as if the paint brush is attached to your head
swim as if you are in a giant pool of Jell-O
move your feet on the floor as if you are ice skating
shake your body as if you are a wet dog
Extension: Can you create your own sentence and ask a family member to try it out? Draw your favourite action and label.

Monday

Optional Read Aloud: ABC Letters in the Library  By: Bonnie Farmer

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing

Would you rather?

Would You Rather?

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

 

Would you rather be a cat or dog?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Wonder Wall
Think of something that you wonder about and write it down (or ask a grownup to help you write it down) and post to a wall. As you discover answers or more questions to your “wonders” add them to the wall! Invite family members to share their questions and wonders too!Exploring Circles
Go for a hunt around your home and find items to practice tracing circles on paper.  Some items could be masking tape, cups of different sizes, paper towel tubes, container lids. Practice drawing circles. Discuss how the circles are the same and different. How many circles did you draw?

Extension: Look for other items around your home to practice drawing shapes (e.g., square, rectangle). Can you name the shapes? Label the shapes? Write down the number of shapes (e.g., I can draw 4 squares)? Can you build with all the items you collected? Tell someone about what you created!

Problem Solving and Innovating

Fingerprint Stamping

Fingerprint Stamping! 

Did you know that our fingerprints are what make us unique? Did you know that you are the only one with a fingerprint like yours? Use a stamp pad or a marker to try stamping your fingerprint. What do you see? What can you turn your fingerprint into? Use a black pen or fine tip marker to decorate your fingerprint to change it into something else (e.g., a bug, an animal)! Can you label your drawing?

Extension: Choose one or more of your fingerprint drawings and create a story. Where does your fingerprint live? What does your fingerprint eat? Where is your fingerprint going? Tell your story to someone at your home or write a story and read it to someone in your home.

Self-Regulation and Well-Being Simon Says
Choose someone in your home to play the game Simon Says. Stand facing each other. One person will be the leader and give an instruction by saying (for example), “Simon says clap your hands” then the partner needs to clap their hands. If the leader does not begin with “Simon says…” and instead they say, “clap your hands,” the person must remain still and not do the action. If the leader calls out, “Simon says, touch your toes” the partner touches their toes. If they don’t do what Simon said, the game is over.  Start a new game.  Some suggested actions could be, hop like a bunny, dance, touch your nose, shake your head, hop on one foot, stomp your feet, clap, wave your hand, turn in a circle, sit down, stand up.Extension: Switch roles and follow their lead. Try making each of the actions go fast, or slow or normal speed and even change the name from Simon says to something you create together (e.g., child’s first name).

Tuesday

Optional Read Aloud: Bailey  By: Harry Bliss

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather? 

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather help with the dishes or help with the laundry?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Rhyme Detective
While going for a walk outdoors (or walk around your home) look for and name ten objects. Make up a rhyming word for each object you found. These words can be real or nonsense words (e.g., chair-bear; floor-more; window-bindow, tree-me)! Take turns with someone and see how many rhymes you can come up with together.  Extension: Bring something to write on and a pencil on your walk. Write down the objects you found.  Try and put these words into sentences.  Choose one of the objects you found and draw a picture of all the things you can think of that rhymes with that word.Short and Tall
Look around your home (or outside). Do you see something that is taller than you? What about something that is shorter than you? Choose one thing that is: taller than you, shorter than you and the same size as you. Can you measure the items using string, or your hands or feet?Extension: Create a chart using the headings taller, shorter, same. On the chart, list all the things you found. If you measured items add the number beside the corresponding item (e.g., chair = 8 hands). Which item is the tallest? Which item is the shortest? How do you know this? Share your thinking.
Problem Solving and Innovating Build a Bridge
What do you know about bridges? Tell someone in your home 5 things you know about a bridge. Can you build a bridge? With a grownup, collect a variety of recyclables that are different sizes (e.g., cereal and Kleenex boxes, empty clean containers, paper towel rolls) and home items (e.g., mixing bowls, strainer, long wooden spoons). Before you start building, draw out a plan or tell someone in your family what your plan is. Have fun exploring the materials!Extension: After building a bridge, test how strong it is. Is it strong enough to hold a small object? How do you know? What might happen if you put 2 objects on the bridge? Test your theory!
Self-Regulation and Well-Being The Guessing Game
Look for 5-10 different objects around your home (inside or outside). One at a time put them into a bag, basket, box, or backpack. Guess what is in the bag by asking questions; Is the object hard or soft? big or small? What shape is it? Can you eat it? Can you smell it? Are you able to figure out what it is?Extension: Change roles! Have the child look for the objects and place them in the bag, basket, box, or backpack. Now switch roles and ask the questions and guess.

Wednesday

Optional Read Aloud: Little Book of Big Fears  By: Monica Arnardo

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather?

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather be able to fly for one day or be completely invisible for one day?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Letter Hide and Go Seek!
Write the letters of your name on pieces of paper (one letter on one piece of paper) and have someone in your home hide them.   Count to 10 and then search for the letters in your name.  As you find the letters put them into the correct order to spell your name.  You could also, as you find the letters, name something that starts with that letter (e.g., a- apple, b- balloon, c- car).Extension: Place each letter on top of an object that starts with that same letter (e.g., a- armchair, b- blanket, c- couch, d- door). Play the same game using all the letters in the alphabet.

Fabulous Five

Fabulous Five
Look around your home. What are some objects that you have more than five? What is something that you have less than five? (e.g., I have less than five tables; I have more than five toys).

Extension: Can you write or draw a list of the objects you found? On your list, tally how many of each object you found. Then, count your tally and write the number (e.g., 5).

Problem Solving and Innovating Treasure Map
Pick an item in your home and hide it! Then using a pencil or marker create a treasure map on a piece of paper. Include instructions (text and/or pictures) as clues to finding the lost item! Ask a person in your home to follow your map to find the lost item.
Suggestions for the instructions could be:

  • Take 10 steps towards the bathroom
  • Walk 5 steps to the left
  • Crawl under the table
  • Look for the black shoe

Reflection: Were the instructions helpful to find your lost item? Did you have any problems? Would you do anything differently? How might you make it more challenging?

Self-Regulation and Well-Being The Listening Game
Using objects from around the house, (e.g., ring a bell, hit a pan), make a sound and listen closely to the vibration of sound. Have the child remain silent and raise their hand when they no longer hear the sound or ringing. Try and remain silent for 30 seconds after the sound and pay close attention to the other sounds you might hear once the vibration sound has stopped.Reflection: How did the sound make you feel? What did the sound remind you of? What were you thinking about while you waited for the sound to stop?

Thursday

Optional Read Aloud: I Wish I Had Freckles Like Abby  By: Kathyrn Heling & Deborah Hembrook

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather? 

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather play in the snow or play in the rain?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour

Lazy Bunny

Let’s Talk About It! 

Using the picture provided, share a story about what is happening in this picture with someone in your home. Use the following questions to add supporting details to your story: What/Who do you see? What happened before this picture was taken? What do you think will happen next?

Writing Extension: On a piece of paper, draw, label and/or write a sentence to represent your story.

Eye Spy Shape Detective
With someone in your home, go for a walk (inside or outside).  Take turns searching for an object that you can see and have the other person guess what you are looking at. You might say “I spy with my little eye something that is” a circle/square/rectangle/triangle. Count how many different shapes you found.

Extension: Draw a picture using only triangles, circles, and rectangles. How many triangles/circles/rectangles did you use in your drawing?

Problem Solving and Innovating Make a Musical Beat!
Can you make a beat to music? You can make a beat by clapping your hands, slapping your legs, drumming on a table, using pots, pans, or left-over coffee tins as drums. Try singing your favourite song or listening to music on the radio and practice different ways you can make a beat.Extension: Without the music, make beat patterns like clap, slap, clap, slap.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Quiet Corner
A quiet space is a great way to limit auditory (noise), visual (what we see), and other sensory inputs (touch, smell) so that a child can regroup and calm their body. Can you build a quiet space in your home? This space could be a corner with some pillows, a canopy made from a sheet, or a desk/table with blankets. Add a favourite stuffy, toy, or something that helps the child feel calm or comforts them when they are upset. In moments when the child is feeling upset, sad, frustrated, or just wants alone time, they can go to this space and use it to help them feel better.

Friday

Optional Read Aloud: Angus All Aglow  By: Heather Smith

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather? 

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather have a robot or a dragon for a pet?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour

Stick Letters

Stick Letters 

While exploring outside, collect sticks. Can you find sticks that look like letters? Can you arrange the sticks to make letters? Can you make words with the sticks? In your home, you could use pencils, markers, straws, Lego pieces, game pieces from other games.

Extension: Make a letter. Can you make the letter that comes before that letter in the alphabet and then the letter that comes after it?

Nature Numbers
During your time outside or from a window in your home, count how many of something you can see. For example: I see 3 birds; I see 4 tires; I see four doors, I see 2 trees.

Extension: Draw a picture of what you saw on your walk. Write the number of items beside your picture.

Problem Solving and Innovating

Indoor Bowling

Indoor Bowling
With a grown up in your home collect a variety of items (8-10) that you could use to play bowling (e.g., empty water bottles, clean and empty recyclables, plastic cups, paper towel rolls).  Set the items up in a row, like a triangle, or in a circle. Using a small ball (or rolled up socks) try and knock the items down.

Extension: Using a marker or piece of paper stick a number on each of the items (see photo for an example using water bottles). Play again. What number(s) did you knock down? What numbers are still standing? Can you make a chart with the heading “up” and ”down”? Write the numbers that fell under “down” and the numbers that are still standing under ”up.”

Self-Regulation and Well-Being Calming Bin
Sensory tactile (touch) bins are great ways to provide an overall calming for some children. One tool that could be used for a sensory break during the day is a calming bin. Fill a shoebox, baking dish, empty plastic container or the kitchen sink with a variety of items to explore and move hands through. Some examples could be water and dish soap, mixing water and sand/dirt (what does that feel like?). Add items (e.g., spoons, cups, small toys) to scoop, pour, and fill. You might ask questions during play: Which container holds more water? Why do you think your mud cakes didn’t hold their shape? What did you find out when you added water to the sand?

Monday

Optional Read Aloud: Bunny Days  By: Tao Nyeu

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather?

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather play inside or outside?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour

Elephant

Let’s Talk About It! 

Using the picture provided (an elephant in a tree!), share a story about what is happening in this picture with someone in your home. Use the following questions to add supporting details to your story: What/Who do you see? What happened before this picture was taken? What do you think will happen next?

Writing Extension: On a piece of paper, draw, label and/or write a sentence to represent your story.

Terrific Ten
Get ready to move your body! While moving around your home or while outside, do actions in groups of ten. Skip ten times, hop ten times, wave your hand ten times, clap your hands ten times. Can you do it fifteen times? What about twenty?

Problem Solving and Innovating Role Play
Think of a book you enjoy or a story someone told you and pretend you are the characters. For example, “Oh No! Puppies are stuck on the top of a snowy mountain! We must save them! What should we do first?” While role-playing, ask the child what materials you might need to save the puppies, who they would ask to help, and the steps needed to solve the problem.
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Spy Detective:
Can you be a detective? Collect 5-10 items that are familiar to you (e.g., a pencil, a small ball, a piece of Lego, a small toy, a spoon). With someone in your home play spy detective. Put 5 of the items you collected on a table or on the floor. Have the child look at the items for 10 to 15 seconds. Once the child has looked at them for 10 to 15 seconds, cover the items with a small blanket, a tablecloth, a pillowcase, or a tea towel. Ask them to tell you what is hidden under the blanket and see if they remember. Start with 5 items and increase the number of items to challenge your memory.

Tuesday

Optional Read Aloud: And You Can Come Too  By: Ruth Ohi

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather? 

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather make a snowman or build a sandcastle?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Words in My Home
Let’s go on a word search! Look for 5-10 objects in the home that have writing (words) on it. For example: a ketchup bottle, soup can, flyer, book, or a newspaper. Using a pencil and paper, write down the letters and/or words you see on each object.Extension: Write or say a sentence using the words you wrote down (e.g., I like ketchup on my fries).

Making Patterns

Making Patterns
Check out this pattern using natural materials from outside (see photo).  While outside with a grownup, collect a variety of nature items (e.g., sticks, rocks and/or leaves) on a walk, in your backyard, or at the park. Make a pattern with the sticks and rocks (e.g., stick, rock, stick, rock).

Extension: Can you make a pattern with three items? (e.g., grass, leaf, rock, grass, leaf, rock). This activity can be completed inside too! Try and make a pattern using small objects around the home (e.g., shoe, sock, mitten).

Problem Solving and Innovating Ripped Paper Art
With a grownup, look through the recycle bin for clean grocery flyers and cardboard boxes (e.g., cereal, crackers, or other snacks). Collect several of each to create art. First, rip the paper up into various shapes. Then, create a picture using the pieces of paper. Ask: Tell me about your art. What colours did you use? Can you mix it up the pieces and create a different picture? Which one did you like better? Why?
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Let’s Stretch!
Sit on the floor with your legs crossed. Start by breathing in for 5 seconds, then out for 5 seconds (count to 5). Give yourself a big hug and twist back and forth, right, and left. Then, hold your arms up in front of you, elbows bent and touching palm to palm, breathe in. As you breathe out, slowly move your arms apart, elbows still bent, and stop when they are beside your ears. Repeat 4 more times. Breathe in, put your right arm up. Breathe out and put your arm over your body to the right. Switch and do the other side. Stretch your back to curve backwards, then curl forward and over your knees.Reflection: Do you feel different after stretching? Why do you think this? What else can you do to calm your body?

Wednesday

Optional Read Aloud: When Pigasso Met Mootisse By: Nina Laden

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather? 

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather fly into space or swim to the bottom of the ocean?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Willoughby Wallaby Wee
Sing or say the poem below. Change the name in the songs to include family and friends’ names! Come up with a silly word that rhymes with the name you wish to use. Additionally, a grownup can sing/say the poem and the child can guess the name based on the rhyming word.Willoughby

Wallaby Wee
An elephant sat on me
Willoughby Wallaby Woo
An elephant sat on you
Willoughby Wallaby Balik
An elephant sat on ____ (Malik)
Willoughby Wallaby Bara
An elephant sat on ____ (Zara)

Ducks

Same and Different
Look carefully at the photo of the ducks.
What is the same about them?
What is different about them?
How do you know this?
Share your thinking.

Problem Solving and Innovating What Would You Do If…?
Pretend the child is a superhero and interview them for a tv show or a local radio station!
Ask them some of the following prompts:
What would you do if a cat was stuck in a tree?
What would you do if you saw two kids fighting over the same toy?
What would you do if an adult was locked out of their house?
What would you do if a giant robot was eating all your snacks?
What would you do if you didn’t have superpowers and you still wanted to help?
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Mirror Mirror
Play this action game with someone in your home.  Choose one person to be a leader and then face each other.  The leader will do an action (e.g., put one hand on your head and one hand on your belly) and the other person will try to do the same action. Try different actions. Looking for a challenge? Try and hold different body positions while standing on one leg or sitting on the floor. Change roles and play again!

Thursday

Optional Read Aloud: Old MacDonald Had Her Farm By: JonArno Lawson

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather? 

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather it be winter all year or summer all year?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Skipping Syllables
While out on a walk or in your home, notice the objects around you. Jump or skip the number of syllables these objects have (e.g., chair- one jump; table-two jumps; sidewalk-two jumps).Extension: On a piece of paper create three columns numbered 1, 2 and 3. Write down the words that you jumped syllables for. Which column has the most?

Pinecones

Pattern Hunt 

While looking out your window or while out for a walk, notice the patterns that are outside. Windows, sidewalks, flowers, trees, bricks, gardens are all places where there might be patterns. What do you see? Look around your house. What patterns to you see? How do you know they are patterns?

Extension: Draw and label a picture of the patterns you see. Share your patterns with someone in your home.

Problem Solving and Innovating Which One is Missing?
Let’s play a memory game.  Collect 10-15 objects around your house or outside (e.g., a shoe, a pebble, a leaf, a toy, a spoon etc.).  Lay them out on the ground or on a table.  Tell the child to study the objects and then turn around so they can’t see.  Remove one object and then ask them to look and try and guess what is missing. Take turns being the person to remove an object. Try removing two objects. Try using different objects. This game can be played inside or outside!
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Write a Letter!
Find a quiet spot in your home where you can write a letter or draw a picture for someone. Think about family members, pets, friends, or neighbours that are important to you. Write a letter (or draw) about different things.
For example:

  • My favourite memory with you is…
  • I love you because…
  • I am thankful for you because…
  • My first impression of you was…

Friday

Optional Read Aloud: Duck! Rabbit! By: Amy Krouse Rosenthal

4 Frames Learning Opportunities
Belonging and Contributing Would You Rather? 

A “Would You Rather” question is a wonderful way to engage in some critical thinking. Read the question with the child and discuss both options and invite the child to state which option they choose and why!

Would you rather have a magic carpet to fly you around or your own personal robot?

Demonstrating Literacy and Mathematics Behaviour Concentration
Cut up or rip pieces of paper with each letter of the child’s name (written twice for pairing) to create cards. Place the cards face down on a table. Each player turns over two letters and reads them. If the child is working on identifying letters, they can say the letter name. If the child is working on saying letter sounds, they can say the letter sound. If a match is made the player keeps the cards and gets another turn. Play until all the cards have been collected.Extension: Continue with play with different letters of the alphabet or high frequency words (e.g., no, is, can, me, you, and, he, at, a, so, on, in, up, am, we, like, see, I, go, it, do, an, the, my, to).Count the Rainbow
Look around your home or outside. How many green objects do you see? How many blue objects? How many grey objects? How many black objects? What colour do you see the most? What colour do you see the least?Extension: Make a tally chart of the colours you saw (e.g., on one side of the paper write all the colours you saw, on the other side of the paper use tally marks to indicate how many times you saw the colour. For a challenge, write the number that corresponds with the tally marks. For example: yellow = lll = 3.
Problem Solving and Innovating Sorting
Think of different objects in your home that could be sorted into categories. For example: toys, laundry, cutlery, groceries. Make a pile and ask how could they be sorted? For example, how would you sort your clothes? (e.g., pants, socks, shirts). How would you sort your toys? (e.g., plastic, wood, characters, vehicles). Can you sort in another way? Ask: Why is it helpful to sort objects in different ways?
Self-Regulation and Well-Being Say Hello!
Find a safe quiet spot in your home. Start by laying down or sitting in a chair. It will help you to think about and pay attention to all the different muscles and parts of our body that help us to move and enjoy life! Go through your body parts and tense up/squeeze the muscles or areas of your body one at a time. Each time you squeeze, say “Hello toes,” “Hello feet,” “Hello calves” etc. Other body parts could be: arms, hands, shoulders, neck, face, thighs, stomach, chest.
Updated on Wednesday, January 27, 2021.
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