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Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP)

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The Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP) is a School to Work program that opens the door for students to explore and work in apprenticeship occupations starting in Grade 11 or Grade 12 through the Cooperative Education program.

Students have an opportunity to become registered apprentices and work towards becoming certified journeypersons in a skilled trade while completing their secondary school diplomas.

The goals of OYAP are:

  • To provide students with the opportunity to start training in a skilled trade while completing the requirements for an Ontario Secondary School Diploma;
  • To enable students to make the school to work transition by direct entry into apprenticeship training;
  • To provide employers with the opportunity to train the skilled workers they require;
  • To provide a viable solution to address the problem of skilled tradespeople shortages in general, and specifically the lack of young people joining the trades.

For more detailed information please visit the provincial OYAP Website

Accelerated OYAP

Overview of the Program:

  • All students will report to their home school for pre-employment seminars prior to their Accelerated Program.
  • Students will attend an approved Training Delivery Agent. The day of the training will depend on which program students apply for.
  • Students will receive Apprenticeship Training in ultra modern training facilities.
  • The Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development pays the tuition to the training facility for each student selected in the program.
  • A passing mark of 60% is required to be able to obtain the Level 1.

Eligibility:

  • be 17 years of age or older;
  • have successfully completed a minimum of 24 credits;
  • have successfully completed the appropriate course work and co-op placement;
  • attend an interview session and learn about all program requirements; and
  • be a registered apprentice.

Policies:

  1. Selection of students will be based both on the availability of work placements and the suitability of candidates.
  2. Students are not guaranteed a placement.
  3. Remuneration is not guaranteed in this program. Employers are not obligated to pay students during their Cooperative Education placement.
  4. Transportation to school, training centres and placements is the responsibility of the student.
  5. This is a four (4) credit cooperative education program.

How to Apply

Application Deadlines:

Semester 1 programs – May 15th

Semester 2 programs – November 15th

NOTE: General Carpentry Level 1 may not be offered in the 2018/19 school year.  Please contact Joachim Vallentin at jvallent@hwdsb.on.ca to confirm program availability

Automotive Service Technician

Automotive Service Technicians (310S), sometimes referred to as Motor Vehicle Mechanics inspect, diagnose, repair and service mechanical, electrical and electronic systems and components for cars, buses and trucks. They also perform major repair and replacement of mechanical units on newly assembled motor vehicles. Technicians may choose to specialize in engine and fuel systems, brakes, drive lines, suspension, electrical and electronic systems or diagnostic services.

Learn about the business case for training apprentices in the automotive service field

Essential Skills for Success as an Automotive Service Technician NOC Code:7321

Job Related Skills, Interests and Values

  • Reviewing work orders and discussing with co-workers or supervisors
  • Inspecting motors in operation, road testing vehicles and testing automotive systems and components using electronic/computer or other testing devices to diagnose problems and isolate faults
  • Adjusting, repairing or replacing parts and components of automotive systems including fuel, brake, steering and suspension systems
  • Performing scheduled maintenance service such as oil changes, lubrications and tune ups
  • Testing and adjusting repaired systems to manufacturer’s specifications
  • Advising customers on work performed, general vehicle conditions and future repair requirements

You may find additional information about this trade and applicable standards at the Ontario College of Trades (OCOT) website – Motive Power sector link: http://www.collegeoftrades.ca/membership/resources/training-standards.

What Preparation and Training Do You Need?

Grade 12 or the equivalent (GED or ACE) is required under the Ontario College of Trades Apprenticeship Act (2009). It would be beneficial to have credits in Math, Science and English; high school courses in Automotive Mechanics would be an asset. Entry and successful completion of an Automotive Service Technician apprenticeship (7,220 hours) is compulsory and must be followed by successfully passing an OCoT written examination to obtain a Certificate of Qualification. The apprenticeship is comprised of 6500 hours of on-the-job training as well as three 8-week blocks of in-school training.  If you are currently attending high school, you may benefit from enrolling in a Transportation Specialist High Skills Major Program. For additional information, please click the following link:

http://edu.gov.on.ca/eng/studentsuccess/pathways/shsm/transport.pdf

What’s Your Future as an Automotive Service Technician?

You may decide to specialize in fuel and electrical systems, transmission, alignment and brakes or become a truck and coach technician if you work in a large shop that encourages you to specialize in one specific area. You could be employed by a small shop and be required to work in all areas. Most people who work in this field work year-round, full-time mostly indoors with exposure to noise, vibration, liquids, fumes and odours covered by workplace regulations. Employers who might hire you include:

  • Automobile dealers
  • Motor Vehicle Manufacturers
  • Automotive parts and accessories stores
  • Motor Vehicle Parts Manufacturers

Wage Rate

  • apprentices are generally paid less than journeypersons
  • As your work performance, skills and expertise improve, your wages generally increase
  • Hourly wage rates vary from in the range of $11.00 to $29.00 per hour depending on the geographic area where they work, and sometimes provide benefits and the opportunities for overtime

Automotive Service Technician is only available in Semester Two 

Child and Youth Worker

  • Block 1 – Offered during Semester 2
  • Block 2 – Offered during Semester 1

Both blocks must be completed to obtain level 1

Child and Youth Workers (620A) work to improve the physical, emotional, intellectual and social development of troubled children and adolescents.

Job Related Skills, Interests and Values

  • Consulting with health and social agencies, physicians, dietitians, family in regard to mental, physical & emotional health, nutrition or medication
  • Building relationships with children and/or adolescents in order to support them build self-esteem and work towards improving behaviour
  • Gaining a thorough working knowledge of relevant Acts and codes, such as the Child and Family Services Act, Young Offenders Act, Criminal Code, Canada Food Guide etc.
  • Communicating with children, adolescents, families and co-workers; collecting, analyzing and presenting verbal and written information appropriately
  • Acquiring good knowledge of community resources and cultivating community relations
  • Implementing strategies such as planned daily activities, coordinated treatment interventions, organized recreational and social activities
  • Helping develop and maintain individual and group treatment programs

Additional information on training standards for this particular trades in the Service sector may be found on the Ontario College of Trades (OCOT) website at: http://www.collegeoftrades.ca/wp-content/uploads/Child-and-Youth-Worker-620A-EN-TS4.pdf

What Preparation and Training Do You Need?

You will need to complete high school, preferably with senior credits in English/Communications; coop experience in a social services setting or volunteer work with youth would be an asset prior to completion of  an apprenticeship composed of 5280 hours of on-the-job training, as well as 960 hours of in-school training. This is the minimum to be apprenticed in this trade under the (OCTAA) Ontario College of Trades Apprenticeship Act (2009). Please note that minimum entry requirements to this and other trades are currently under review by the Ontario College of Trades.

What’s Your Future as a Child and Youth Worker?

Most Child & Youth Workers are employed wherever troubled children or teenagers are housed – be it a government facility or private home, emergency shelter, treatment centre – wherever community treatment centres are located. They may actually live in the facility or divide their time between an office, residential facility and field visits with clients. Some will work shifts, in a job that can be physically and mentally challenging. Experienced Child & Youth Workers may advance to supervisory or management positions. With additional education they may go on to become a Social Worker, Psychologist, or Marriage and Family Counselor. Most are employed by:

  • Provincial government departments
  • School Boards
  • Private agencies (treatment centres, group homes etc.)
  • Community Youth programs

Wage Rate

  • Apprentices generally earn less than fully qualified Journeypeople
  • Wages increase as your ability and productivity increase
  • Fully qualified Child & Youth Workers earn from $24,000 – $36,000 per year

Child Development Practitioner

  • Block 1 – February – Semester 2
  • Block 2 – September – Semester 1

Both blocks must be completed to obtain level 1

Child Development Practitioners (620C) plan and organize activities for preschool and school age children. They lead children in activities to stimulate and develop their intellectual, physical and emotional growth.

Job Related Skills, Interests and Values

  • caring for infants and toddlers
  • develop and implement daily activities for children
  • lead children in activities by telling or reading stories, teaching songs, demonstrating the use of musical instruments, preparing craft materials and demonstrating their use, providing opportunities for creative expression through art, dramatic play, music and physical fitness
  • guide and assist children in the development of proper eating, dressing, and toilet habits
  • working in a sometimes hectic environment
  • observing children’s social development and play
  • communicating with parents and other staff members
  • continuously learning about new teaching methods and childcare theories

Additional information on training standards for this particular trade in the Service sector may be found on the Ontario College of Trades (OCOT) website.

To view the Essential Skills necessary to work in this occupation, please view the Job Market Report for Child Development Practitioner and Assistants, NOC code 4214:

What Preparation and Training Do You Need?

In order to register as an apprentice, you must be at least 16 years of age or older in the province of Ontario and have completed Grade 12 or equivalent. High school courses in English, Business Communications would be helpful, and enrolment in cooperative education in this field would be advisable. If you are attending high school, you may benefit from enrolment in a Health and Wellness Specialist High Skills Major Program.

Completion of this type of apprenticeship will take 5280 hours of on-the-job training as well as 720 hours of in-school training in classes at a community college. Graduates of the Child Development Practitioner program can choose to specialize in childcare practices for children with disabilities by entering a 3,000 hour Inclusion Practices Child Development Practitioner program. This is the minimum to be apprenticed in this trade under the (OCTAA) Ontario College of Trades Apprenticeship Act (2009). Please note that minimum entry requirements to this and other trades are currently under review by the Ontario College of Trades.

What’s Your Future as a Child Development Practitioner?

Most of the Child Development Practitioners working in this field are female, with 30% working part-time hours. Most work in licensed day care establishments, and with experience may progress to senior positions as Supervisors or Directors. Apprentices in this field may choose to take additional post-secondary education to become Elementary School Teachers. Typical Child Development Practitioner employers include:

  • Municipal governments
  • Day Care Centres
  • Nursery Schools
  • Personal and Household service firms
  • Private households
  • Pre-school sections of hospitals and schools
  • Social Service organizations
  • Self-employed

Wage Rate

The wage rate in this field varies depending on the employer, childcare setting and experience in the occupation: from a low of minimum wage to a high of $17.00/ hour.

Construction Craft Worker

Construction Craft Workers (450A) prepare, excavate, backfill, compact and clean up a work site. They also handle materials as well as ship and receive parts.

Job Related Skills, Interests and Values

  • training in health and safety
  • mechanical aptitude
  • manual dexterity
  • an ability to work at heights
  • an ability to do hard physical work
  • blueprint reading
  • organizational skills
  • an ability to follow instructions
  • must be willing to work as part of a team on physically and mentally challenging projects

What Preparation and Training do You Need ?

To become a Construction Craft Worker, you should preferably have a secondary school diploma this is usually required by employers and unions today, but grade 10 is currently the legal minimum to be apprenticed in this trade under the Ontario College of Trades Apprenticeship Act (2009). Please note that minimum entry requirements to this and other trades are currently under review by the Ontario College of Trades. Completion of  a 2,400 hour apprenticeship will include a combination of on-the-job and in-school training, before successfully writing an examination to obtain your Certificate of Qualification.

What’s Your Future as a Construction Craft Worker?

Most workers in this trade work full-time, sometimes in shift work, sometimes outdoors although working conditions tend to vary from job to job. Some travel to different job sites may be necessary. The trade is best suited for people who are physically fit. Industries in Southern Ontario that employ Construction Craft Workers include:

  • Residential Building Developers
  • Commercial Building Developers
  • Building Construction Firms
  • Mechanical Construction Firms

The Construction Craft Worker apprenticeship is an excellent introductory program for people considering jobs in the construction sector. Construction Craft Workers can go on to specialize in other skilled trades such as carpentry, bricklaying, etc.

For additional information about this career, check out the construction sector website at: www.CareersInConstruction.ca.

Wage Rate

  • As an apprentice, you would start at a wage rate about half that of a journeyperson
  • Wages generally increase as you gain more competency
  • Fully qualified Construction Craft Workers can earn anywhere from $19.00/hr to $30.00 per hour, with benefits and opportunities for overtime as well

Construction Craft Worker is only available in Semester Two 

General Carpenter

General Carpenters (403A) work mainly with wood, wood-substitutes, or other material such as drywall, plaster, steel, copper or tiles. General Carpenters may construct, erect, install, maintain or repair various structures and be responsible for framing and forming or finishing cabinets, doors, stairs and other major wooden structures.

Learn about the business case for training apprentices in the carpentry field

Essential Skills for Success as a Carpenter Red Seal NOC Code: 7271

Job Related Skills, Interests and Values

  • Reading and interpreting blueprints and drawings
  • Planning the most effective way to complete a project
  • Using knowledge of the qualities of wood (grain, density, flexibility) to select the best material for the job
  • Laying out, measuring, cutting assembling and joining various materials
  • Using a variety of hand and power tools safely and effectively

You may find additional information about  General Carpentry and applicable standards at the Ontario College of Trades (OCOT) website – Construction sector link: www.collegeoftrades.ca/trades/training-standards1/construction.

To view the Essential Skills necessary to work as a Carpenter click on the following link and scroll down to Carpenter NOC code 7271: http://www10.hrsdc.gc.ca/CE/English/ShowProfile.aspx?v=201

What Preparation and Training Do You Need

To become a General Carpenter, you should preferably have a secondary school diploma  this is usually required by employers and unions today, but grade 10 is currently the legal minimum to be apprenticed in this trade under the Ontario College of Trades Apprenticeship Act (2009). Please note that minimum entry requirements to this and other trades are currently under review by the Ontario College of Trades. Completion of  a 3,844 hour up to 7200 hour apprenticeship will include a combination of on-the-job and in-school training, before successfully writing an examination to obtain your Certificate of Qualification. General Carpenter skills are transferable to other trades as well. . If you are currently attending high school, you may benefit from enroling in a Construction focused Specialist High Skills Major program. For more information, please click on the following link:

http://edu.gov.on.ca/eng/studentsuccess/pathways/shsm/construction.pdf

What’s Your Future as a Carpenter?

Most Carpenters work full-time, usually with building construction firms or residential/commercial building developers, but a significant number are self-employed. Technological changes in the field will mean that carpenters will need to become computer literate in order to work with computer based drawing, estimating and cost reporting systems. Examples of typical employers include:

  • Interior and Finishing construction companies
  • Residential Building Developers
  • Commercial Building Developers
  • Building Construction firms
  • Self-employed

For additional information about this career, check out the construction sector website at: www.CareersInConstruction.ca

Wage Rate

  • An Apprentice generally makes significantly less than a journeyperson
  • A Carpenter’s wage increases as he/she gains more experience and skills
  • As skills and knowledge increase, wages do as well; a general Carpenter can make from $18.00-$33/hour depending on the quality of their work and what geographic area they live in

General Carpenter is only available in Semester Two  

Truck and Coach Technician

Truck & Coach Technicians (310T) service, repair, overhaul, diagnose and inspect motor coaches, heavy trucks and truck-trailers.

Job Related Skills, Interests and Values

  • Detecting and diagnosing operating problems in frames and steering mechanisms, engines, transmissions, brakes, ignition, axles, fuel systems, engine management systems, suspension systems, electrical/electronic systems, emission control systems and air conditioning/refrigeration systems
  • Adjusting, overhauling, repairing and reassembling engines, transmissions, clutches, rear ends, differentials, brakes, drive shafts, axles and other assemblies
  • Using various diagnostic equipment to diagnose and isolate faults
  • Keeping up to date on advances in technology and updating skills
  • Communicating effectively with co-workers, customers and service managers
  • Reading and interpreting owner/operator/manufacturer operating manuals and service specifications

You may find additional information about this trade and applicable standards at the Ontario College of Trades (OCOT) website – follow this sector link:http://www.collegeoftrades.ca/membership/resources/training-standards

To view the Essential Skills necessary for someone to work in this occupation, click on the following link for NOC code 7321:

http://www10.hrsdc.gc.ca/ES/English/ShowProfile.aspx?v=9

What Preparation and Training Do You Need?

Truck & Coach Technician is a restricted trade in Ontario. Grade 12 or the equivalent (GED or ACE) is required under the Ontario College of Trades Apprenticeship Act (2009). It could be beneficial to have credits in Math and English and preferably some related subjects such as in-school technical programs, co-op programs or pre-apprenticeship courses. You must complete an apprenticeship of 6720 hours. 6000 hours of on-the-job training as well as three 8 week blocks of in-school training (720 hours) prior to successfully passing a written examination for your Certificate of Qualification.

What’s Your Future as a Truck and Coach Technician?

Most Truck & Coach Technicians work full-time, with some risk of injury involved in working around heavy equipment. Exposure to exhaust fumes and other chemicals such as oil/lubricants is common. Employers that hire Truck & Coach Technicians include:

  • Municipally, Provincially or privately owned Coach companies
  • Transportation companies
  • Construction or other material handling businesses

Check out our Success Story article on Bryant Trailer Services Inc in Brampton Ontario for additional information about this occupation.

Wage Rate

  • Apprentices generally earn less than fully qualified Journeypeople
  • Wages increase as your ability and productivity increase
  • Fully qualified Truck & Coach Technicians can earn in the range of $10.25 -$ 29.00 per hour depending on the geographic location where they work

Truck and Coach Technician is only available in Semester Two

Updated on Wednesday, March 21, 2018.
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