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Westmount

History

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Department Members:

  • Mr. C. Benning
  • Mr. M. Cox
  • Mr. C. Kuepfer
  • Mr. E. Lootsma
  • Mr. J. Miller
  • Mr. J. Misuk
  • Mr. S. Mrmak
  • Ms. J. Nicholls
  • Mr. P. Paterson
  • Mr. D. Thomas
  • Mr. T. Van Harten

Want to Learn More? Click on the subjects below!

Grade 10

Canadian History

CHC2D1  – Grade 10, Canadian History (Academic)

Through critical thinking in the form of reflective writing, proper research and thesis development, students explore the national and global forces that have shaped Canada’s identity from World war 1 to the present. Students will investigate the impact of social and polictical structures as well as the contributions of individuals and groups who have helped shape the Canadian culture and society as they explore the recurring issues such as the Canadian autonomy, French-English relations & multiculturalism.

CHC2P1 – Grade 10, Canadian History (Applided)

Through Their examination of some of the pivotal events that have influenced the development of Canada’s identity as a nation from World Ware 1 to the present, students will learn how individuals and groups have contributed to Canadian culture and society. The course draws upon student’ own experiences to make connections to historical events and help them develop informed opinions concerning Canadian identity and diversity.

CHC2D1G – Grade 10, Canadian History (Gifted)

Through independent research, personal reflection and thesis development, students will examine the historical roots of contemporary issues as well as the socials, political and economic forces that have shaped modern Canada. Through their use of critical thinking and communication skills, students will consider events and ideas in historical context, debate issues of culture and identity, and use evidence to support and present the viewpoints.

Civics

CHV2O1 – Grade 10, Civics (Open)

This course explores what it means to be informed, participating citizen in a democratic society. Students will learn about the elements of democracy in local, national, and global contexts, about political reactions to social change, and about political decision-making processes in Canada. They will explore their own and others’ ideas about civics questions and learn how to think critically about public issues and react responsibly to them.

Grade 11

World History to the 16th Century

CHW3M1 – Grade 11, World History to the 16th Century (College/University)

This course investigates the history of humanity from earliest times to the sixteenth century. Students will analyse diverse societies from around the world, with emphasis on political, cultural and economic structures and historical forces that have shaped the modern world. They will apply historical inquiry, critical-thinking, and communication skills to evaluate the influence of selected individuals, groups, and innovations and to present their own conclusions.

American History

CHA3U1 – Grade 11, American History (University)

This course traces the social, economic , and political development of the United States from colonial times to the present. Students will examine issues of diversity, identity, and culture that have influenced the country’s social and political formation and will consider the implications of its expansion into a global superpower. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to determine causal relationships, evaluate multiple perspectives, and present their own points of view.

World Religions

HRT3M1 – Grade 11, World Religions (College/University)

Enables students to discover what other believe & how they live, & to appreciate their own unique heritage. Students will learn the teachings & traditions of a variety of religions, the connections between religion & the development of civilizations, the place & function of religion in human experience, & the influence of a broad rang of religions on a contemporary society.

Sociology, Anthropology and Psychology

HSP3m1 – Grade 11, Sociology, Anthropology and Psychology (College/University)

Introduces the theories, questions, & issues that are the major concerns of anthropology, psychology & sociology. Students will develop and understanding of the way social scientists approach the topics they study & the research methods they employ. Students will be given opportunity to explore theories from a variety of perspectives & to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues that have captured the interest of classical & contemporary social scientists int eh three disciplines.

Canadian Law

 

Grade 12

Canadian and International Law

CLN4U1 – Grade 12, Canadian and International Law (University)

(Taught out of Westmount Business Department)

This course examines elements of Canadian and international law in social, political, and global contexts. Students will study the historical and philosophical sources of law and the principals and practices of international law and will learn to relate them in issues in Canadian society and the wider world. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to analyse legal issues, conduct independent research, and present the results for their inquiries in a variety of ways.

History, Identity and Culture

CHI4U1 – Grade 12, Canada: History, Identity and Culture (University)

This course explores the challenges associated with the formation of a Canadian national identity. Students ill examine the social, political, and economic forces that have shaped Canada from the pre-contact period to the present and will investigate the historical roots of contemporary issues from a variety of perspectives. Students will use critical-thinking and communication skills to consider events and ideas in historical context, debate issues of culture and identity, and present their own views.

Word History: The West and the World

CHY4U1 – Grade 12, World History: The West and the World (University)

This course investigates the major trends in Western civilization and world history from the sixteenth century to the present. Students will learn about the interaction between the emerging West and other regions of the world and about the development of modern social, political, and economic systems. They will use critical-thinking and communication skills to investigate the historical roots of contemporary issues and present their conclusions.

CHY4C1 – Grade 12, World History: West and the World (College)

This course will examine world history since the 16th Century. It will focus on the emergence of the West and examine the development in this region through economic, social and political change. Students will also develop skills in historical inquiry and develop an appreciation for how our world has come to be.

Canadian and World Politics

CPW4U1 – Grade 12, Canadian and World Politics (University)

This course examines Canadian and world politics form a variety of perspectives. Students will investigate the ways in which individuals, groups, and states work to influence domestics and world events, the role of political ideologies in national and international politics, and the dynamics of international cooperation and conflict resolution. Students will apply critical thinking and communication skills to develop and support informed opinions about current political conflicts, events and issues.

History and Film

IDC4U1 – Grade 12, History and Film (University)

** Course unique to Westmount, not available at any other school

In our increasingly media-based and visual culture, a growing amount of what we learn about history comes form the movies. By examining films set in the past, this course emphasizes the consolidation of literacy, historical inquiry, critical thinking and communication skills. Using their knowledge of film techniques, composition, concepts and theories, students will see history through a lends and examine truth in historically-based films. By deconstructing and analyzing a selection of historical movies form a variety of periods, students will identify the historical film’s construction of reality & its dichotomy of historical accuracy vs. artistic freedom.

Updated on Thursday, June 07, 2018.
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